Death Quotes

“Ah, Lalage! while life is ours, Hoard not thy beauty rose and white, But pluck the pretty fleeing flowers That deck our little path of light: For all too soon we twain shall tread The bitter pastures of the dead: Estranged, sad spectres of the night.” ― Ernest Dowson, The Poems and Prose of Ernest Dowson
“Once upon a time there was a young prince who believed in all things but three. He did not believe in princesses, he did not believe in islands, he did not believe in God. His father, the king, told him that such things did not exist. As there were no princesses or islands in his father’s domains, and no sign of God, the young prince believed his father. But then, one day, the prince ran away from his palace. He came to the next land. There, to his astonishment, from every coast he saw islands, and on these islands, strange and troubling creatures whom he dared not name. As he was searching for a boat, a man in full evening dress approached him along the shore. Are those real islands?’ asked the young prince. Of course they are real islands,’ said the man in evening dress. And those strange and troubling creatures?’ They are all genuine and authentic princesses.’ Then God must exist!’ cried the prince. I am God,’ replied the man in full evening dress, with a bow. The young prince returned home as quickly as he could. So you are back,’ said the father, the king. I have seen islands, I have seen princesses, I have seen God,’ said the prince reproachfully. The king was unmoved. Neither real islands, nor real princesses, I have seen God,’ said the prince reproachfully. The king was unmoved. Neither real islands, nor real princesses, nor a real God exist.’ I saw them!’ Tell me how God was dressed.’ God was in full evening dress.’ Were the sleeves of his coat rolled back?’ The prince remembered that they had been. The king smiled. That is the uniform of a magician. You have been deceived.’ At this, the prince returned to the next land, and went to the same shore, where once again he came upon the man in full evening dress. My father the king has told me who you are,’ said the young prince indignantly. ‘You deceived me last time, but not again. Now I know that those are not real islands and real princesses, because you are a magician.’ The man on the shore smiled. It is you who are deceived, my boy. In your father’s kingdom there are many islands and many princesses. But you are under your father’s spell, so you cannot see them.’ The prince pensively returned home. When he saw his father, he looked him in the eyes. Father, is it true that you are not a real king, but only a magician?’ The king smiled, and rolled back his sleeves. Yes, my son, I am only a magician.’ Then the man on the shore was God.’ The man on the shore was another magician.’ I must know the real truth, the truth beyond magic.’ There is no truth beyond magic,’ said the king. The prince was full of sadness. He said, ‘I will kill myself.’ The king by magic caused death to appear. Death stood in the door and beckoned to the prince. The prince shuddered. He remembered the beautiful but unreal islands and the unreal but beautiful princesses. Very well,’ he said. ‘I can bear it.’ You see, my son,’ said the king, ‘you too now begin to be a magician.” ― John Fowles
“Of all the miracles Po had seen in the time and space of its death, Po thought this–the absorption of another, the carrying of it–was the most bewildering and remarkable of all. Whenever Bundle separated again, Po was left with an ache of sadness that reminded the ghost of the body it had left behind.” ― Lauren Oliver, Liesl & Po
“Where music thundered let the mind be still, Where the will triumphed let there be no will, What light revealed, now let the dark fulfill.” ― May Sarton
“And then she moved from shock to grief the way she might enter another room.” ― Anita Shreve, The Pilot’s Wife
“No death, no doom, no anguish can arouse the surpassing despair which flows from a loss of identity. – Through the Gates of the Silver Key” ― H.P. Lovecraft, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
“Graham Chapman, co-author of the “Parrot Sketch”, is no more. He has ceased to be. Bereft of life, he rests in peace. He’s kicked the bucket, hopped the twig, bit the dust, snuffed it, breathed his last, and gone to meet the great Head of Light Entertainment in the sky. And I guess that we’re all thinking how sad it is that a man of such talent, of such capability for kindness, of such unusual intelligence, should now so suddenly be spirited away at the age of only forty-eight, before he’d achieved many of the things of which he was capable, and before he’d had enough fun. Well, I feel that I should say: nonsense. Good riddance to him, the freeloading bastard, I hope he fries. And the reason I feel I should say this is he would never forgive me if I didn’t, if I threw away this glorious opportunity to shock you all on his behalf. Anything for him but mindless good taste. (He paused, then claimed that Chapman had whipered in his ear while he was writing the speech): All right, Cleese. You say you’re very proud of being the very first person ever to say ‘shit’ on British television. If this service is really for me, just for starters, I want you to become the first person ever at a British memorial service to say ‘fuck’.” ― John Cleese
“Death is a personal matter, arousing sorrow, despair, fervor, or dry-hearted philosophy. Funerals, on the other hand, are social functions. Imagine going to a funeral without first polishing the automobile. Imagine standing at a graveside not dressed in your best dark suit and your best black shoes, polished delightfully. Imagine sending flowers to a funeral with no attached card to prove you had done the correct thing. In no social institution is the codified ritual of behavior more rigid than in funerals. Imagine the indignation if the minister altered his sermon or experimented with facial expression. Consider the shock if, at the funeral parlors, any chairs were used but those little folding yellow torture chairs with the hard seats. No, dying, a man may be loved, hated, mourned, missed; but once dead he becomes the chief ornament of a complicated and formal social celebration.” ― John Steinbeck, Tortilla Flat
“Of course what I’m about to share isn’t true for me but… Friends, somebody said, are “god’s apology for relations.” (p. 129)” ― Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir
“But try to remember that a good man can never die. You will see your brother many times again-in the streets, at home, in all the places of the town. The person of a man may go, but the best part of him stays. It stays forever.” ― William Saroyan